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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/11407

Title: Safety of antimalarial drugs exposure during early pregnancy
Authors: Tagbor, Harry
Antwi, Gifty
Dogbe, Joslin
Keywords: malaria in pregnancy
first trimester
antimalarials
adverse outcomes
Issue Date: 19-Jun-2014
Publisher: DovePress
Citation: Tagbor, Harry, Gifty Antwi, and Joslin Dogbe. "Safety of antimalarial drugs exposure during early pregnancy." Research and Reports in Tropical Medicine 5 (2014): 23-33.
Abstract: Inadequately controlled malaria infection in pregnancy is associated with poor maternal and fetal outcomes. However, there are important questions about drug safety for mothers with malaria and their fetuses as, currently, there is limited safety data on many of the medications used. The objective of this review is to determine from published evidence the safety of antimalarial drugs exposure during early pregnancy, focusing on abortions, stillbirths, and congenital abnormalities. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Malaria in Pregnancy databases from their inception to June 2013, inclusive, for reports published in English only. Data were extracted on exposure to antimalarial drugs during early pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes including congenital abnormalities, stillbirth, and miscarriage. Results: Twenty-two publications including one abstract with a total of 6,333 early pregnancy exposures to antimalarial agents used for treatment and/or prevention of malaria in pregnancy met the inclusion criteria. More than 40% of the pregnancies were exposed to mefloquine, about 10% to artemisinin based regimens and, 15.2% and 14.7% were exposed to chloroquine and quinine, respectively. A total of 1,199 adverse outcomes including abortions, stillbirths, and congenital abnormalities were reported. The reported absolute risks of adverse outcomes were similar for all the antimalarial exposures, but, in two publications, increased risk of stillbirths was linked to mefloquine exposure. Extensive heterogeneity and variability in the way in which authors assessed, recorded, and reported safety data precluded formal meta-analysis. Conclusion: The absolute estimates of risks obtained in the included studies are difficult to interpret and the clinical significance of any association of adverse outcomes reported with antimalarial exposure in early pregnancy is uncertain. Well planned, executed, and analyzed studies are needed to confirm whether there is increased risk for adverse fetal outcomes attributable to exposure of first trimester pregnancies to antimalarials compared to relevant controls.
Description: Published in Research and Reports in Tropical Medicine
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/11407
Appears in Collections:College of Health Sciences

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