DSpace
 

KNUSTSpace >
Research Articles >
College of Arts and Social Sciences >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/11768

Title: Feminism as a Model in Pottery: Contribution of Women to the Preservation of Pottery Heritage
Authors: Abaka-Attah, Mercy
Opoku-Bonsu, Kwame
Gbologah, Lemuel
Keywords: Gender Roles
Seashells
Male Dominance
Indigenous Pottery
Contemporary Pottery
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: International Journal of Sciences: Basic and Applied Research (IJSBAR)
Citation: Abaka-Attah, M., Opoku-Bonsu, K., & Gbologah, L. Feminism as a Model in Pottery: Contribution of Women to the Preservation of Pottery Heritage.International Journal of Sciences: Basic and Applied Research (IJSBAR) (2017) Volume 32, No 3, pp 1-12
Abstract: In Ghana, estimated populations of about 51.4% are women. Majority of these women are engaged in petty trading, craftwork, menial jobs and farming, with unsecured sources of income. This study investigates the contribution of women in the preservation of pottery.The practical activities carried out to achieve the objective of this research was based on development of conceptualization, gathering of materials, forming techniques, firing and decoration. The study identifies the seashell as a metaphor to address the roles women play in pottery production. The seashells are used as feminine symbols that revive female participation in modern pottery production that has been dominated by males. It is recommended that in order to optimize the contribution of women in the preservation of pottery, it is important to design programmes and policies that would empower women to become independent and self-sufficient. This study suggests that, this can be achieved whenalternative livelihoods such as access to finance, capacity building, training and development, and technical services are created.
Description: Main article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/11768
ISSN: 2307-4531
Appears in Collections:College of Arts and Social Sciences

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Abaka-Attah et al.pdf1.18 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Valid XHTML 1.0! DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2010  Duraspace - Feedback