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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/13437

Title: Knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) of foodservice providers, and microbial quality on food served in Kumasi
Authors: Gyebi, Barbara Efua Akyaa
Annan, Reginald Adjetey
Apprey, Charles
Asamoah-Boakye, Odeafo
Asare, Chris Yaw
Keywords: Food safety
Hygiene
KAP
Microbial load
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: Journal of Foodservice Business Research
Citation: Barbara Efua Akyaa Gyebi , Reginald Adjetey Annan , Charles Apprey , Odeafo Asamoah-Boakye & Chris Yaw Asare (2020): Knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) of foodservice providers, and microbial quality on food served in Kumasi, Journal of Foodservice Business Research, DOI: 10.1080/15378020.2020.1859972
Abstract: Background: Poor Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices (KAP) of food safety and hygiene by foodservice providers lead to food contamination and pose health threats to consumers. This study assessed the KAP on food safety and hygiene, and microbial quality of food sold by formal and informal foodservice providers in Kumasi, Ghana. Methods Eighty-one (81) foodservice providers were conveniently selected from ten different foodservice establishments. KAP on food safety and hygiene practices was assessed with a structured-questionnaire, while practices were observed with a prepared checklist. Food samples were collected and analyzed for microbiological counts (aerobic and coliform) and the detection of Staphylococcus species. Results About 58.7% of participants reported good knowledge versus 41.3% reporting little knowledge; 32.4% reported good attitude versus 67.6% bad attitude, and 54.6% reported good practices versus 43.4% poor practices. More informal foodservice providers (51.7%,34.5%,55.2%) had knowledge (p = .012), attitude (p = .798), and practices (p = .003) of food safety and practices below the 40th percentile than those of formal food service (23.1%,32.7%,19.2%) respectively. Food samples tested recorded high microbial counts for total aerobes and coliform counts and failed to meet ISO, GSA, and FDA safety standards. S. aureus, E. coli, S. epidermidis, and E. faecalis were identified in food samples. A weak, negative correlation (r = −0.231,p < .05) existed between attitude score and S. species present. Conclusions Poor KAP and microbial contamination were observed among food providers although the informal food provision was poorer. Bad attitude by foodservice providers was associated with poorer microbial quality of tested food. Education, monitoring, and stringent enforcement of HACCP are recommended.
Description: An article published by Barbara Efua Akyaa Gyebi , Reginald Adjetey Annan , Charles Apprey , Odeafo Asamoah-Boakye & Chris Yaw Asare (2020): Knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) of foodservice providers, and microbial quality on food served in Kumasi, Journal of Foodservice Business Research, DOI: 10.1080/15378020.2020.1859972
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/13437
Appears in Collections:College of Science

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