DSpace
 

KNUSTSpace >
Theses / Dissertations >
College of Agric and Natural Resources >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/8434

Title: Investigating the potential of Moringa (Moringa Oleifera) and Pigeon Pea (Cajanus Cajan) as supplementary dry season livestock feed in the Northern Region of Ghana
Authors: Danse, Mary Salifu
Issue Date: 1-Apr-2016
Abstract: Moringa (Moringa olifera) and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) have been both identified as a multipurpose tree and legume that have appreciable levels of crude protein that could be used as a dry season feed supplement for livestock. Growth rate, average weight gain and availability of Moringa olifera and Cajanus cajan were investigated for the potential of Moringa olifera and Cajanus cajan as supplementary dry season livestock feed in the northern region of Ghana for Djallonke sheep. Djallonke sheep were completely randomized into 3 treatments levels (T1-T3) with four replicates in pens. Sheep in treatment 1 (control) were fed with feed other than cajanus cajan and moringa olifera on dry matter basis, treatment 2 were fed with Cajanus cajan husk on dry matter basis while those in treatment 3 were treated with a feed containing Moringa oleifera leaves on dry matter basis, respectively. The findings of this study indicated clearly that there was no significant difference (p>0.05) among treatments for white blood cell level, haemoglobin and blood sugar concentration. However, there were significant difference (p<0.05) on all body weight parameters measured in the study. Animals fed with Moringa olifera diets had the highest average daily weight gain of 105.80g followed by those fed with Cajanus cajan diet (82.59g) whilst those fed with the control diet recorded the lowest average daily weight gain of 42.97g. The study further showed that 50% of farmers provide feed for the livestock. 85 % of the farmers confirmed availability of Moringa olifera and Cajanu scajan as livestock feed whilst 15% said no. It was revealed that majority of the farmers (70%) obtained the Moringa olifera from plantations whilst 30% obtained the Moringa olifera from the farm. Again, all farmers obtained the Cajanus cajan from the farm. The study revealed that 60% of the farmers had no knowledge of Moringa olifera and Cajanus cajan as livestock feed whilst 40% were knew about it. Again, 60% of the farmers had no knowledge that Moringa olifera and Cajanu scajan could improve growth of livestock but 40% had knowledge that Moringa olifera and Cajanus cajan can improve growth of livestock. The study revealed that Moringa olifera and Cajanus cajan are generally known to farmers as animal feed sources, readily available to farmers and largely preferred by livestock (75%). Djallonke sheep can be fed with both Cajanus cajan and Moringa oleifera diets during the dry season and further research should be conducted to assess the appropriate pre-treatment methods for these crops.
Description: A thesis submitted to the School of Graduate Studies, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in fulfilment of the reqiurement for the award of Master of Philosophy (Wildlife and Range Management)Degree, 2015
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/8434
Appears in Collections:College of Agric and Natural Resources

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
THESIS.pdf754.81 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Valid XHTML 1.0! DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2010  Duraspace - Feedback