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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/9643

Title: Association between aflatoxin exposure and health characteristics, liver function, hepatitis and malaria infections in Ghanaians
Authors: Williams, Jonathan H.
Jolly, Curtis M.
Adjei, Ohene
Wang, Jia-Sheng
Stiles, Jonathan K.
Nnedu, Obinna
Appawu, Jennifer
Awuah, Richard T.
Ellis, William Otoo
Jiang, Yi
Jolly, Pauline E.
Issue Date: Dec-2007
Publisher: Journal of Nutritional&Environmental Medicine
Citation: Journal of Nutritional&Environmental Medicine September–December 2007; 16(3–4): 242–257
Abstract: We examined the relationship between various health parameters and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) albumin adduct levels in plasma. Design. A cross-sectional field study was conducted in four villages in the Ashanti region of Ghana. A survey on socio-demographic and health characteristics was administered to 162 volunteers and blood (20 ml) was donated by 140 participants. AFB1 albumin adduct levels, liver function, hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV, HCV) and malaria infections were determined. AFB1 levels ranged from 0.12 to 2.995 pmolmg21 albumin (mean¡standard deviation50.89¡ 0.46) and was categorized based on the median as low (,0.80 pmolmg21) or high (>0.80 pmol mg21) and used in the analyses. By multivariate analysis, significantly higher levels of AFB1 were obtained for participants who reported symptoms of acute aflatoxicosis: history of yellow mouth (odds ratio55.5, confidence interval51.04–29.07, p50.04); history of sore swollen stomach (odds ratio54.54, confidence interval51.28–15.62, p50.01). A history of painful vomiting was marginally associated (p50.09) with high AFB1 levels. Between 30 and 40% of the study group had abnormal liver function and HBV/HCV infections. Total protein and alanine transaminase (ALT) were positively correlated to AFB1 levels (p,0.01 and p50.02, respectively). For every unit increase in AFB1, total protein increased by 0.27 units and ALT increased by 0.20 units. HBV was associated with high AFB1 levels (p50.055) and HCV was marginally associated with low AFB1 levels (p50.08). Approximately 20% of study participants were positive for malaria antigen in blood. A number of symptoms and disease markers were not significantly associated with AFB1.
Description: This Article was published by Journal of Nutritional&Environmental Medicine September–December 2007; 16(3–4): 242–257
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/9643
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