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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/9714

Title: The Effect of Malaria and Intestinal Helminth Coinfection on Birth Outcomes in Kumasi, Ghana
Authors: Yatich, Nelly J.
Jolly, E.
Funkhouser, Ellen
Agbenyega, Tsiri
Rayner, Julian C.
Ehiri, John E.
Archer, Turpin
Stiles, Jonathan K.
Ellis, William Otto
Jiang, Yi
Williams, Jonathan H.
Issue Date: 2010
Publisher: Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
Citation: Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg., 82(1), 2010, pp. 28–34 doi:10.4269/ajtmh.2010.09-0165 Copyright © 2010 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Abstract: This study was conducted to investigate the effect of Plasmodium falciparum and intestinal helminth coinfection on maternal anemia and birth outcomes. A cross-sectional study of 746 women who delivered in two hospitals in Kumasi was conducted. Data were collected using an investigator-administered questionnaire and from patients’ medical records. Blood was collected for determination of P. falciparum and hemoglobin levels. Adverse pregnancy outcomes were high (44.6%). Coinfection (versus no infection) was associated with 3-fold increase in low birth weight. For women with anemia, coinfection was 2.6 times and 3.5 times as likely to result in preterm deliveries and small for gestational age infants. The odds of having anemia was increased almost 3-fold by coinfection. Coinfection (versus helminth only) resulted in increased risks of anemia, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. This study demonstrates that women with malaria and intestinal helminth coinfection are at particular risk of adverse birth outcomes.
Description: This Article was published by Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg., 82(1), 2010, pp. 28–34 doi:10.4269/ajtmh.2010.09-0165 Copyright © 2010 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/9714
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