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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/9732

Title: Comparative assessment of the performance of Parkia biglobosa, Glycine max and Treculia africana in the production of a local condiment (dawadawa) in Ghana
Authors: Adu, G.
Ellis, William Otto
Oduro, I.
Appiah, F.
Keywords: functional properties
mineral composition
Proximate composition
Issue Date: 15-Mar-2012
Publisher: African Journal of Food Science
Citation: African Journal of Food Science Vol. 6(5), pp. 111-116, 15 March, 2012 Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJFS DOI: 10.5897/AJFS12.007 ISSN 1996-0794 ©2012 Academic Journals
Abstract: This study was conducted to assess the performance of three high protein beans (Parkia biglobosa, Glycine max and Treculia africana) in dawadawa (fermented condiment) production. The beans of the crops were boiled for an hour and then fermented for 72 h. Standard procedures were used to assess the proximate, mineral and functional properties of the resultant condiments. Sensory evaluation was also conducted. The results showed that the protein content of P. biglobosa (49.69%) was not significantly (P>0.01) different from that of G. max (47.39%) but both were significantly higher than that of T. africana (21.28%). On the other hand, T. africana had a significantly higher (P<0.01) carbohydrate content (45.91%) than the other 2 crops. G. max had the highest K (1460 mg/100 g), Na (124 mg/100 g) and Ca (2400 mg/100 g) contents, while T. africana was highest in Mg (816 mg/100 g) and P (424 mg/100 g). As regards water absorption capacities, no significant differences were observed between the crops. However, the oil absorption capacities of the condiments differed significantly from each other (P<0.01). The colour and aroma of P. biglobosa was adjudged more acceptable than G. max and T. africana. Generally, the stew prepared using P. biglobosa was more acceptable than those from G.max and T. africana which were considered similar (P>0.01). The results showed that aroma of the condiment was the most important predictor (R2=0.84) of overall acceptability. The results of this study indicate that although P. biglobosa condiment was the most acceptable, similar condiments could be produced using G. max and T. africana beans without much apprehension of its acceptability.
Description: This Article was published by African Journal of Food Science Vol. 6(5), pp. 111-116, 15 March, 2012 Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJFS DOI: 10.5897/AJFS12.007 ISSN 1996-0794 ©2012 Academic Journals
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/9732
Appears in Collections:College of Science

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